SEO – fading in importance?

Important, but overhyped? Search Ranking Optimization (SEO) is a critical necessity for today’s internet-savvy business, and yet Google is always chasing down abusers of the system. In fact, the search leader is getting better and better at it with their various updates, such as Penguin and Panda. That means as time goes on, it will be more difficult to game the system. (Read our post, “Slapped by Google: How a top SEO performer fell from grace.”) We’re glad to see Google’s policing power, aren’t you? How many times have you chosen the top listing when you are searching for a car part, or a camera? You expect the number-one ranking company to be the best, not someone who’s just paid an SEO hack to get there. Having said that, your website should still be properly set up to be search-bot friendly. Your site should be properly built to be indexed by search engines such as Google. Secondly, you must have an ongoing SEO program in place, which means making regular updates on your website with quality content, as well as having incoming links from other sites that are relevant to your site. We don’t want to ignore the growth of social media marketing such as Facebook. They’ve grabbed a lot of marketing muscle away from Google. That affects any business that is anywhere near social in character. But you still are greatly helped with a website, and it needs to be SEO-friendly. The big Google-rilla Google is the big boy on the block with its huge majority of the search market — about two thirds — and you must play by...

Free whitepaper: 16 white-hat Google search secrets

This past weekend we interviewed Steve Constable, a Chicago SEO expert, and published our discussion as a whitepaper. The whitepaper and newsletter announcing it has proved popular — 32% of our newsletter list read the newsletter only four hours after it was sent. If you’d like to get the free whitepaper, “Top SEO expert reveals 16 white-hat secrets of how to rank #1 on Google” just sign up for our newsletter in the box below and you will immediately be taken to the download page. Sign up today and get our free whitepaper about the 16 white-hat SEO techniques. Also check out our Newsletter...

Climbing above your competitors: Top SEO expert reveals white-hat secrets of how to rank #1 on Google

This week we interview Steve Constable, a top web designer and search engine optimization (SEO) marketer in Chicago. If you search on Google under “Chicago web design,” his company, SteveConstable.com, comes up first. That’s impressive. We caught up with Steve this past weekend at the Chicago SEO Group. meeting in Chicago. At the meeting, which was very spirited, about half of the participants were SEO experts, and the other half business people. Right now Steve is setting up an SEO program for a professional services business, and he was willing to share some of his top secrets, which include Google’s latest algorithmic twists. We’ve summarized the key points here. To respect the privacy of Steve’s client, we’ll refer to his business as a pet grooming and boarding business. TreeFrogClick: Steve, tell me about your SEO strategy. Steve: Thanks, Kevin. We plan two approaches. First of all, we’ll put up hundreds of pages on the client’s website that have as keywords “pet grooming,” “pet boarding,” “pet care,” and so on. TreeFrogClick: Now, all these articles won’t go up all at once, right? Steve: Correct. Google likes to see a consistency, a regularity. Too much at once raises the red flag. I’ll have an article going up about once every three days, for ten years. TreeFrogClick: Ten years? Steve: Yes, ten years. If you want long-term results, you have to go for the long term. Back links – not all created equal TreeFrogClick: What else do you do for SEO? Steve: Every month I find back links in appropriate-niche websites related to the subject matter of the client. Sometimes the pickings are slim...

The perennial question: why doesn’t my website rank high on Google?

One sore thumb that stuck out and ruined a website’s ranking — and it may happen to you Also, get your free, 31-point SEO site analysis by phone What is one of the most common errors in Search Engine Optimization (SEO)? Just yesterday I talked with a woman who was troubled that her website was not ranking high on Google. “I want to get a number one ranking for my main search term,” she said of her faith-based website. “We used to rank on page one.” “Don’t even try to get to get that high on that term alone,” I replied. “There’s too much competition,” I said as I looked at the large-sized organizations listed. “You need a more descriptive phrase, a longer phrase, if you want to rank at the top,” I replied. Actually, I was surprised to find that a Google page check revealed no fewer than 31,000 pages on her site. That’s why she did rank high once. But as I tooled around her site, I saw the fly in the ointment. Hidden from Google “I can see only about 30 articles listed under your news page,” I said, scrolling to the bottom of the page. “Where are the other articles?” “You can get to them if you just search on the site, in the search bar, under a person’s name, or topic. It works well,” she explained. Whoops. I had to deliver the bad news. “It doesn’t work that way,” I said. “You don’t get credit from Google for all those pages. Google doesn’t search that way; their ‘crawlers’ have to find the pages listed...

Why SEO? Because they need to find you

Search Ranking Optimization (SEO) is a critical necessity for today’s internet-savvy businesses. Your website must first of all be properly built to be suitable for search engines such as Google. But that is not enough. You must put an SEO program into place, which means making regular updates on your website, as well as having incoming links from other sites relevant to your site. Our program provides custom-written news stories that are posted on your website, as well as on a network of websites that include incoming links from relevant websites. We also contact writers and editors at important news outlets that can drive traffic. This exposure increases the ranking of your website on Google and other search engines and will attract those looking for your services. “TreeFrogClick’s program of placing customized news articles on our website clearly supplied a good number of clients coming to our pregnancy center. Some months after Kevin’s program started, we began to see a more sophisticated clientele knocking on our door. We also were able to build an authoritative collection of articles on our website, and that no doubt helped our reputation as knowledgeable professionals.” — Laura Nelson, Executive Director, WomanCare Services, Berwyn, IL (January...

A Yelp review can smash your online reputation

A man approached me. He was upset. I had just given a short explanation of online reputation management at a recent business breakfast. “My name has been trashed online,” he complained. “The person who did it was not even a customer.” The man was a successful acupuncturist, and now his reputation was beschmirched on Yelp, which carried a negative comment on Google’s first page “snippet,” or descriptive phrase, under a search for his business name. Groupon crunch The man had received a call from a person who wanted an appointment, but was unhappy because he was not able to use his Groupon coupon by the deadline. As you may know, Groupon gives you 50% off or more on services, but you must use it within a certain time. The acupuncturist said he had an appointment open for the next day, and that although the patron could not use the coupon, he was offered a $40 discount on a treatment toward the normal charge of $75. Sounds fair to me. The odd thing about this was that the entire story was part of the Yelp listing, but that the phrase, “I’d rather lose what I paid than spend another dime on this place” came up on Google’s snippet. And yet on the Yelp page, this bad comment was not even the most recent one. A real knife stick. Why is Yelp so unfair? Turns out that Yelp is notorious for sticking bad comments to a business by putting them into the “description” tag of the underlying HTML, which Google picks up for its snippets. And yet when the acupuncturist called...
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